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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 5:47 am 
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Happy Halloween!

So, as is my tradition, I have decided to write something for Halloween. This will be the fifth year running that I have posted a Halloween themed piece on Halloween. It's my favorite of the holidays, so I like to do something to commemorate it with and for you fine people here. My previous Halloween treats include 2014's "Screams in the Dark," 2015's, poetic piece "Beyond the Shadows," 2016's "Some Enchanted Evening," and of course last year's "Daneera and the Domovoi."

This year, I have opted to return to the world of the poetic to offer you what I hope will be an interesting piece which I have called "Necromancer's Lament." This piece has an interesting genesis, which I look forward to sharing with everyone after you have had a chance to read the poem and make your own decisions.

Enjoy, and happy Halloween!

Necromancer's Lament


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 7:10 am 
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Raven, it's a testament to how thoroughly you've conditioned me to expect trickeration of one form or another that I immediately copied down the first letters of each line in the poem, just to make sure that they didn't spell out some sort of acrostic. And it is a further testament that, even when it was clear that they didn't spell words, I still hesitated for another minute or so, trying to see if there were any obvious anagrams, or if they had a phonetic meaning.

Which probably explains why I have been getting odd looks here this morning, as I sip my coffee and make noises like "AWSSST" to myself... :takei:

Anyway, I really, really, really love this poem. Geeze, talk about a sense of mood. There's this sense of regret and loss which is just palpable, and I think the second stanza -- which is maybe my favorite? -- sort of sets the tone for all that. I think that regret is maybe the most powerful double-edged sword in human emotion -- it can either be a powerful driver for positive change, or it can be this terrible, corrosive agent -- this kind of acid-tipped arrow from the past which will eat you away from the inside if you let it. And so the line about "Remorse, that dark and sour wine, / That taints the purest glass" really gets at me, for that reason.

Anyway, this is fantastic, and I can't wait to hear more about all the background machinations. :D Thanks, as ever, for sharing, and Happy Halloween!

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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 8:17 am 
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Thanks! My work recently put in a blocker which blocks "game sites" which sadly NGA qualifies as, so I cannot respond as thoroughly as I would like, but I will just say that not all acrostics use every line... :plot:


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PostPosted: Wed Oct 31, 2018 9:37 am 
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Thanks! My work recently put in a blocker which blocks "game sites" which sadly NGA qualifies as, so I cannot respond as thoroughly as I would like, but I will just say that not all acrostics use every line... :plot:

*checks again*

*sees it*

*head e'splodes*

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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 4:56 pm 
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Raven, I don't often come out of retirement to post stuff on NGA, but I'll do it just to let you know your poetry never ceases to blow my mind.

I don't know half of your poems half as well as I should like, and I remember less than half of them as well as they'd deserve, but this might well be your best one... :hattip:

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Tell why Truth must fight with Falsehood, and why Truth will always win."
—Love Song of Night and Day


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 02, 2018 8:12 pm 
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Thanks! My work recently put in a blocker which blocks "game sites" which sadly NGA qualifies as, so I cannot respond as thoroughly as I would like, but I will just say that not all acrostics use every line... :plot:

*checks again*

*sees it*

*head e'splodes*

I should really stop making your head e'splode one of these days.

:mad:

Raven, I don't often come out of retirement to post stuff on NGA, but I'll do it just to let you know your poetry never ceases to blow my mind.

I don't know half of your poems half as well as I should like, and I remember less than half of them as well as they'd deserve, but this might well be your best one... :hattip:

Thank you, Pavor! That means a lot to me. I was very happy with this poem, and there's kind of a lot going on with it, so I'm really glad that people like it!


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 03, 2018 11:51 pm 
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Okay, so, I said that this poem had an interesting genesis, so I would like to talk about it!

Raven's Self-Absorbed Ramblings


Happy Halloween everyone!


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:25 am 
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The work you have done with the structure is great! And it explains why the third and third to last stanzas are my favorites :D I really like how the card's mechanics are woven in the poem, and how they give a emotionally charged explanation as to why necromancers can use the dead as a vessel for divination.

Thanks for sharing!

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2018 11:56 am 
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The work you have done with the structure is great! And it explains why the third and third to last stanzas are my favorites :D I really like how the card's mechanics are woven in the poem, and how they give a emotionally charged explanation as to why necromancers can use the dead as a vessel for divination.

Thanks for sharing!

Thanks, Huey! I'm glad you liked it. Another interesting thing about the third stanza is that it is when the speaker of the poem emerges. It's the first use of "I" in the poem, beginning the process of personalizing the regret that Orcish mentioned. And I'm glad you liked the use of the card's mechanics; one of my favorite things to do with MTG poetry is find thematic ways to include aspects of the card.

Thanks for reading!


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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:25 pm 
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I should really stop making your head e'splode one of these days.

It would certainly be a boon to my wallpaper budget!


I really love this stanza because it really is a turn in the poem. Before this point, the speaker is mostly setting up backstory, explaining a bit about what happened (he lost his love) and how he feels about it (remorseful, as Orcish pointed out). After this stanza, though, the tone sort of shifts a bit. It becomes about what his dead love can do for him, and the things he'll do in her name. It's where he mentions his zombies (a thematic connection to the effect on the card, which needs zombies in order to work), hints at the power she is granting him, and ultimately where he turns his feelings over her death into a sort of revenge against the world that took her from him.

As JFK famously said, ask not what your undead lover can do for you, but what you can do for your undead lover.

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PostPosted: Sun Nov 04, 2018 8:27 pm 
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I really love this stanza because it really is a turn in the poem. Before this point, the speaker is mostly setting up backstory, explaining a bit about what happened (he lost his love) and how he feels about it (remorseful, as Orcish pointed out). After this stanza, though, the tone sort of shifts a bit. It becomes about what his dead love can do for him, and the things he'll do in her name. It's where he mentions his zombies (a thematic connection to the effect on the card, which needs zombies in order to work), hints at the power she is granting him, and ultimately where he turns his feelings over her death into a sort of revenge against the world that took her from him.

As JFK famously said, ask not what your undead lover can do for you, but what you can do for your undead lover.

Chiasmus, baby!


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