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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2021 1:44 am 
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I am learning a lot about Greco-Roman religion here. I knew about the animism stuff, but I had no idea it was so decentralized. I guess we only see one version of the gods. I knew many myths had the details changed, but assumed that the gods at least were pretty nailed down.

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PostPosted: Sun Jan 17, 2021 9:03 am 
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I'm not entirely sure about the tie between lares and cults, though I'd be spitballing, too. I do know (recently learned, actually), that many ancient gods were worshipped under different epithets by different "cults" (often different city-states had different names and aspects for what they would identify as the same god). For instance, in Athens, Aphrodite Pandemos was worshipped mostly as the Aphrodite we all know from popular culture, but in Sparta they worshipped Aprhodite Areia, and she was an armored war goddess.

@Lares-cults: I'm not saying they have a direct relationship, but it looks to me like they fulfill a very similar role of otherwordly beings watching over a specific location. I was about to say we don't have the equivalent of public lares, but every state, region and city has a patron saint, so...

Looking up the Greek meanings for the epithets makes it quite intuitive: as gods were capricious and mutable in mood and attitude, for a battle you called upon the Areia ("warlike") aspect of the goddess because you didn't really know how her Pandemos ("of/for everyone") aspect could decide to contribute to a war. Sparta being Sparta, they had many gods who they worshiped mainly in their "warlike fashion" :V

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I remember reading about the Romans basically outbidding their enemies for their foreign gods and that's just hilarious :D A very shrewd move on their part!

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(homosexuality seemed to not be much of a factor as long as you weren't taking a "feminine" role).

That kind of opinion never went out of fashion...

(this reminded me of Catullus' invectives. Oh boy...)

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PostPosted: Thu Jul 01, 2021 8:04 pm 
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I found myself doing a bit more Greco-Roman research alongside wolves and wild boars, and I have a small update to the do ut des concept from Roman religion. Since wild animals did not belong to human beings, they could not be sacrificed as offerings to the gods specifically because they were not theirs to give.

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2021 12:21 am 
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So even a hunted animal that killed and took out of the wilderness would still be considered a part of nature and not man's world? You wouldn't really own it? Or is it more like you stole it so it doesn't make a great gift?

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CotW is a method for ranking cards in increasing order of printability.

*"To YMTC it up" means to design cards that have value mostly from a design perspective. i.e. you would put them in a case under glass in your living room and visitors could remark upon the wonderful design principles, with nobody ever worring if the cards are annoying/pointless/confusing in actual play

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PostPosted: Fri Jul 02, 2021 7:38 pm 
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The way the Wikipedia article was worded (the article on Mars, the Roman god), it seems that sacrifices were either limited to domestic (usually agricultural) animals like pigs, cows, goats, et cetera, or at least a vast majority were as such.

I suppose it's entirely possible that this practice varied depending on the god, but with my understanding of Roman's belief system with local gods of everywhere/everything, then I would think that, like, any wild game you might offer would already belong to whatever god-of-the-woods would want it?

Basically I'm saying that I don't know, but it makes sense as an absolute rule to me.

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PostPosted: Tue Oct 12, 2021 6:52 pm 
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In an interesting turn, it so happens my instincts that hibernation generally results in a longer lifespan for the creature which hibernates may, in fact, be true.

I read a paper today about a primate, of all things, with an unusually long lifespan. The fat-tailed dwarf lemur is a tiny little lemur (~260g) that lives in Madagascar and aestivates (that's hibernate but during summer) for 3-7 months of the year, and it somehow lives up to 30 years, despite closely-related species (also living in similar areas of Madagascar) only living around 10-15 years. The paper even compared it to other mammals of similar size and it still sits quite outside the norm. It basically lives as long as lemurs 10x its size (as a general rule, larger creatures live longer).

There seems to be a similar phenomenon seen in other hibernating animals -- I plan to do more research into it, and other forms of dormancy -- which was hinted at in the paper, that hibernating animals can live longer on an individual level, and are more resistant to environmental stress and extinction on a species level, than those that don't. Part of that is obvious -- hiding away in a burrow for several months in a year makes animals less likely to be eaten -- but hibernation is also a highly controlled form of thermoregulation that may utilize the same mechanisms that stave off aging on a chemical/cellular level. Basically put, they really do "use up less of their allotted lifespan" while in torpor.

Evolutionarily speaking, the same process that keeps hibernating animals safe from predators makes them less likely to find mates, so it makes sense that their reproductive years would be prolonged to counteract this. In the case of the fat-tailed dwarf lemur, they spend a rather long period of their lives (~60%, at least in captivity in managed breeding programs) in "breeding age" and on top of that don't really experience the decline of senescence until quite near the end of their lives (a ratio of 0.97, which means that on average they've lived 97% of their lives by the time they experience things like cataracts).

I realize that this doesn't mean a whole heck of a lot around here, where we have more free reign to "a wizard did it' with our races, but for those that would like a more realistic take on their races, it means we have a clear indication that a race which hibernate yearly (like, say, bearkin might) could easily have like a 200 year lifespan (estimating a human lifespan as 100 years).


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